Sample Scripts

Fanfare For The Common Man

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Composer:
Aaron Copland (1900 – 1991)
CD 3 Trk 14
Composition:
Fanfare for the Common Man
Time: 2:48
Day 1:
This week’s feature composer is Aaron Copland. The feature composition is Fanfare for the Common Man. A fanfare is a special kind of composition, usually written to announce something, or someone, very important. Kings and Queens use fanfares. Sometimes, fanfares are used to celebrate special occasions, like the Olympic Games. Copland wanted to write a composition to celebrate people all over the world. He called his composition Fanfare for the Common Man.
Day 2:
This week’s feature composer is Aaron Copland. The feature composition is Fanfare for the Common Man. Copland wanted his fanfare to sound special and important. He decided to use brass instruments and percussion for his composition. Copland began his fanfare with a strong statement from the bass drum and gong. Then he composed a powerful, robust theme for the trumpets to play. Copland wanted everyone to know right from the beginning that this composition was written to announce the importance of all the people in the world.
Day 3:
This week’s feature composer is Aaron Copland. The feature composition is Fanfare for the Common Man. Copland wrote his fanfare for brass and percussion because he wanted it to sound special and important. After the opening statement from the bass drum and gong, Copland composed a powerful, robust theme for the trumpets. This theme is repeated with the horns which makes it sound regal. The third time we hear the theme, Copland adds the trombones and tympani which give the fanfare more strength. He includes the tubas on the fourth repetition. Copland wanted his fanfare to grow and grow. It is almost as if he is trying to get the whole world to listen to his music.
Day 4:
This week’s feature composer is Aaron Copland. The feature composition is Fanfare for the Common Man. Copland decided to write his fanfare for percussion and brass in such as way that it would grow and grow. He starts with a strong statement from the bass drum and gong. Then a powerful, robust theme played by the trumpets is heard. The theme is repeated with the horns added, making it sound regal. Then, Copland adds the trombones and tympnai to the theme which gives it more strength. The tubas are included on the next repetition for added power. Copland wanted his fanfare to sound special, important, momentous! He wanted the whole world to celebrate.
Day 5:
This week’s feature composition is Fanfare for the Common Man. Do you remember the name of the composer? (Short pause.) Did you remember Aaron Copland? Good for you. Copland wrote a fanfare for brass and percussion that grows and grows. This makes it sound like a celebration. Copland wanted his Fanfare for the Common Man to tell us that people the world over are special and important.

Oboe Concerto In D Minor

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Composer:
Antonio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741)
CD 8 Trk 7
Composition:
Oboe Concerto in D Minor RV 535
Time: 4:32
2. Largo
3. Allegro molto
Day 1:
This week’s feature composer is Antonio Vivaldi.
The feature compositions are the second and third movements from Oboe Concerto in D Minor. Vivaldi liked the sound of the oboe. He knew it could sound thoughtful or active, flowing or bouncy. In this concerto, Vivaldi used two oboes as the featured instruments. He composed the second movement for the thoughtful, flowing voice of the oboe. For the third movement, Vivaldi wrote music to show the oboe’s other personality. It is fast and bouncy.
Day 2:
This week’s feature composer is Antonio Vivaldi.
The feature compositions are the second and third movements from Oboe Concerto in D Minor. Vivaldi knew how to use the sound of the oboe to create contrasting musical ideas. For the second movement, Vivaldi composed melodies for the two oboes that are flowing, thoughtful, may be even a little sad. He created this effect by making the melody for one of the oboes very close to the other. It’s almost as if they are rubbing together.
Day 3:
This week’s feature composer is Antonio Vivaldi.
The feature compositions are the second and third movements from Oboe Concerto in D Minor. Vivaldi used the flowing sound of the oboe in the second movement. For the third movement, he decided it was time for a contrast. Vivaldi composed fast, bouncy melodies for the two featured oboes. He made the melodies similar, but instead of rubbing against each other, they run along side-by-side.
Day 4:
This week’s feature composer is Antonio Vivaldi.
The feature compositions are the second and third movements from Oboe Concerto in D Minor. Vivaldi enjoyed composing music for both personalities of the oboe. He wrote a flowing, thoughtful melody for his second movement. Vivaldi made these melodies rub against each other. As a contrast, Vivaldi wrote a fast, bouncy melody for the third movement. He made these melodies run along side-by-side.
Day 5:
This week’s feature compositions are the second and third movements from Oboe Concerto in D Minor. Do you remember the name of the composer? (Short pause.) If you are thinking of Antonio Vivaldi you are correct. Vivaldi used what he knew about the sound of the oboes to create music with different personalities-thoughtful or active, flowing or bouncy.