Sample Scripts 2

Planet for the Taking

Click on the play icon to hear the music sample.


Composer:
Michael Conway Baker (b. 1937)
CD 9 TRK 5
Composition:
Suite from “Planet for the Taking”
7. Newton
CBC SMCD 5107
Time: 2:18

Day 1:
This week’s feature composer is Michael Conway Baker.
The feature composition is “Newton” from Suite from “Planet for the Taking.” Michael Conway Baker is a Canadian composer who is alive today. He studied composition at the University of British Columbia with another composer, Jean Coulthard (KOOL tard). Baker likes to compose music for movies, films, and television. This composition was written for orchestra to accompany a television program by scientist and environmentalist David Suzuki called “Planet for the Taking.”
 
Day 2:
This week’s feature composer is Michael Conway Baker.
The feature composition is “Newton” from Suite from “Planet for the Taking.” Baker composed this music for orchestra to accompany a scientific television program called “Planet for the Taking.” The program covered topics from whales in the ocean to the wonders of the solar system. Baker chose the celesta (che LEH sta) to be the first instrument we hear. He wanted his music to enhance what the viewers were watching, not to be a distraction. Baker created his music so that, even without the television picture, it is easy to make up our own images.
 
Day 3:
This week’s feature composer is Michael Conway Baker.
The feature composition is “Newton” from Suite from “Planet for the Taking.”
Baker wanted his music for orchestra to enhance the television program, so he composed long, lyrical phrases to be played softly. Baker used the strings as background then layered percussion and wind instruments over top for contrast. To make his music more visual, he used the different sounds of the orchestra as a colour palette, just like a painter uses colours to create certain visual effects. Baker wanted his music to convey many different images.
 
Day 4:
This week’s feature composer is Michael Conway Baker.
The feature composition is Newton from Suite from “Planet for the Taking.”
Baker composed long, lyrical phrases and had the orchestra play softly. To create different images, he used the strings as background and then layered other instruments on top for contrast. Baker selected special percussion instruments like the celesta, and horns, flutes, clarinet, trombone, and muted trumpets to create his musical colours. Baker knew how to compose his music to help the television viewer enjoy the program, but not be a distraction.
 
Day 5:
This week’s feature composition is Newton from Suite from “Planet for the Taking.”
Do you remember the name of the composer? If you are thinking of Michael Conway Baker, you are right. Baker composed his music for orchestra for the television program “Planet for the Taking” by David Suzuki. The program covered topics from whales in the ocean to the solar system. You have heard Baker’s music without seeing the program. Do you think Baker’s music is about inner space, outer space, or the space in between?

October Week 4 Year 7

Costumes and Dress Up

Click on the play icon to hear the music sample.


Composer:
Harry Somers
Igor Stravinsky
CD 9 Trk 16
CD 7 Trk 15
Composition:
“Circus” from Picasso Suite
“Marche” and “Valse” from Suite No. 2
Time: 1:46
Time: 3:16
Day 1:
CD 9 Trk 16
This week we hear two feature composers: Harry Somers and Igor Stravinsky.
Today, we will listen to Harry Somer’s composition “Circus” from his Picasso Suite. Somers composed Picasso Suite in 1964 for a television program about the artist Pablo Picasso. Picasso painted a series of clown images. Somers composed the “Circus” movement for his Picasso Suite to set the mood for looking at Picasso’s clowns. He decided to begin his music with a long roll on the snare drum as if the Ringmaster were saying: “Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Clowns!”
 
Day 2:
CD 7 Trk 15
Today, we listen to our other feature composer for this week, Igor Stravinsky.
The feature compositions are two movements from Suite No. 2 named “Marche” and “Valse.” Stravinsky originally composed Suite No. 2 for piano duet. After he had rewritten it for orchestra, it was used as ballet music. Do you think this ballet had a story? What sort of costumes do you think the dancers wore?
 
Day 3:
CD 9 Trk 16
Today our feature composer is Harry Somers.
The feature composition is “Circus” from his Picasso Suite. Somers knew that clowns make us laugh by moving in awkward ways, sometimes losing their balance, or even falling down. He created a theme for the clowns with a noticeable syncopated rhythm. Somers liked the way this offbeat rhythm matched the clowns’ jerky movements. Somers chose the trumpet to introduce his clown theme; it’s a good match for the physical, often noisy way clowns behave.
 
Day 4:
CD 7 Trk 15
Today’s feature composer is Igor Stravinsky.
The feature compositions are “Marche” and “Valse” from Suite No. 2. Stravinsky knew we would expect to feel a marching beat in “Marche” and a swaying beat in “Valse,” so that’s what he composed. However, Stravinsky also enjoyed creating musical ideas that we would not expect. For “Valse,” he composed a happy melody for the flute. Stravinsky made it sound as if we could whistle along, but when we try, his melody never seems to do exactly what we think it should. It makes us wonder just what kind of movements the dancers would have made to Stravinsky’s quirky melody.
 
NOTE:
For Day 5, play your choice of “Circus” (CD 9 Trk 16) or “Marche” and “Valse” (CD 7 Trk 15).
 

Day 5:
This week we listened to two different feature compositions, “Circus” from Picasso Suite
and “Marche” and “Valse” from Suite No. 2. Do you remember the names of the composers? Did you remember Harry Somers and Igor Stravinsky? Both composers had a flair for offbeat and unexpected musical ideas. Perhaps you will be able to tell your teacher which composer’s music is our feature composition today. Which composer would you choose to listen to if you were planning a costume party?